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Did you get a call from 888-382-1222?

The (888) 382-1222 Email Scam – A chain email is being circulated once again (this email has circulated in the past), prompting people to call the government’s Do Not Call list (which is legitimate, but if you’ve already done it unnecessary), and then asking the email recipient to forward the email:

Email Body: The email received reads as follows:

REMINDER….. all cell phone numbers are being released to telemarketing companies and you will start to receive sales calls.…. YOU WILL BE CHARGED FOR THESE CALLS
To prevent this, call the following number from your cell phone: 888-382-1222.
It is the National DO NOT CALL list It will only take a minute of your time.. It blocks your number for five (5) years. You must call from the cell phone number you want to have blocked. You cannot call from a different phone number.

HELP OTHERS BY PASSING THIS ON .. It takes about 20 seconds.

Email Scam: The only accurate piece of information in this email is the phone number, which is the government’s Do Not Call number. The rest of the information is false. Cell phone numbers are not going public this month. The Do Not Call List permanently blocks your number, not just for 5 years – so once you register a phone number, there’s no need to re-register it. And finally, there’s no need to pass on the email – by this time, most people are already aware of the Do Not Call list, and sending unsolicited emails around will only serve to aggravate people.

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About Alex Schenker

Alex has in-depth experience with security systems, security software, identity protection and privacy legislation. He loves tennis, hiking, and surfing.
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  • Saoiray

    I’m kind of late to answering this, but I imagine they’re hoping people don’t pay attention and end up removing their phone numbers from the Do Not Call list instead. Sadly people don’t pay enough attention to the things around them.

  • Anonymous

    Is there even a point to them consistently emailing out this email? I don't understand the motive. The Do Not Call List is a public service, how is the email sender profiting from sending out this chain mail?

    • ASecureLife.com

      Good question. I suppose it's possible that the sender is hoping to have their email address verified as a trusted source, after which they can send you the real spam. Or – they may get access to your contacts' email addresses in some way shape or form.

  • Anonymous

    The Do Not Call List is almost worthless in my opinion. That being said, I suppose it has stopped legitimate callers from bugging me. The only problem now is that I keep getting calls from scam artists.

  • Anonymous

    That would do just the opposite: 1. What if I change my mind? Can I take my number off the National Do Not Call Registry? You can delete your phone number only by calling toll-free 1-888-382-1222 from the telephone number you want to delete. After you contact the registry to delete it, it will be removed from the National Do Not Call Registry by the next day. But telemarketers have up to 31 days to access information about your deletion and add your number back to their call lists, if they choose to.

  • Anonymous

    Does any one know what the charges are? And how much is charged, or for what, or to whom?

  • Anonymous

    This story is a myth, which has been around since 2004. Cell #s are NOT being released to telemarketers and there is no such deadline. Federal Trade Commission on Do Not Call Cell Phones. For Release: February 6 , 2007 The truth about cell phones and the DNC Registry is: Contrary to the e-mail, cell phone numbers are NOT being released to telemarketers, and you will NOT soon be getting telemarketing calls on your cell phone. There is NO deadline by which you must register your cell phone number on the Registry.

    • ASecureLife.com

      You're right. The call reports are solely for the purpose of verifying the legitimacy of the given phone number. You'll notice that we state above "Email Scam: The only accurate piece of information in this email is the phone number, which is the government's Do Not Call number. The rest of the information is false."

  • Anonymous

    I did call this like an a** & now have been getting call's from other #'s!

  • Anonymous

    There are special interests who monitor Facebook to find "nice people" who can be fooled into spreading misinformation. With elections coming up, this can be dangerous. Remember the "death panel" hoax, the "birther" hoax, etc.? Started by special interests, these lies became viral messages used to dupe other "nice people" – and the next thing we see is the spectacle of enraged, misinformed people hopping up and down with misspelled signs. Remember that? Well, that's how it got started. We all need to help prevent the spread of misinformation. If you see bogus information on a friend's page, correct them. Please. I agree that telemarketers are a pain. I agree that it's a good idea to get on the govt "Do Not Call" list – and it's been a good idea since 2004 (old news). My concern is about the false urgency (hysteria) created by the LIES in the first two sentences of the current scam. Nothing new is happening "this month…" or next month. Nothing is "being released to telemarketing companies…" Too many "nice people" are manipulated by non-political "urgent messages" and that their good intentions are used against them. Special interests start with "non-political" messages to build their lists of nice people who can be duped. Then they use this list to spread their political "urgent messages" of misinformation. Special interests count on well-intentioned but poorly-informed people. Don't let yourself become a victim of this sleazy tactic.