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The 10 States with the Fewest Home Break-ins

A burglary is defined as “entry into a building illegally with intent to commit a crime, especially theft,” and sentences vary depending on factors like whether or not a weapon was present and each state’s laws.

When it comes to home security and break-ins, some states are safer than others. Using data collected by the FBI, we’ve compiled a list of the 10 states with the lowest numbers of recorded break-ins per 100,000 inhabitants. Read on to see if your state is one of the safest from break-ins.

US Burglary Map

US Burglary Map

States with the Fewest Break-ins

10. Nebraska

Nebraska has a burglary rate of 338.7 burglaries per 100,000 people, making it the tenth safest state from break-ins in the United States. This may be because of its low unemployment rate, which is currently 1.6 percent lower than the national average. Nebraska also pours a lot of money and attention into its police and fire services, which seem to help residents stay safer.

9. Massachusetts

Massachusetts is a state relatively safe from burglary, but incidents vary greatly between areas. In Hopkinton, a town of around 16,000 people and the starting place for the Boston Marathon, only one burglary occurred in 2016, while Pittsfield, with a population of over 46,000 experiences roughly 414 burglaries annually.

8. Vermont

Interestingly, Vermont has never had any real gun laws, which some credit for the state’s low crime rates. Its constitution and a set of statutes known as the “Sportsmen’s Bill of Rights” make it nearly impossible for anyone to institute gun control. These statutes could be a significant contributor to Vermont’s relatively low instance of home break-ins.

7. New Jersey

Despite its reputation otherwise, New Jersey is actually a relatively safe state and has a burglary rate of 312.1 per 100,000 inhabitants. Property crimes are lowest in the city of Washington Township, which experiences 1.76 burglaries per 1,000 people.

6. Pennsylvania

Potential burglars in Pennsylvania may be convicted without even completing their crime if they enter a building with the intent of committing burglary. It’s also illegal to possess burglar’s tools such as fake keys or crowbars. The state’s burglary rate is 309.8 per 100,000 people.

5. Wyoming

Living in the rural state of Wyoming has advantages beyond fewer traffic jams and shorter lines at the grocery store—it also has a burglary rate of 300.6 per 100,000 inhabitants, which puts it as the fifth safest state from break-ins.

4. Connecticut

Connecticut is good at educating its residents about the risks of burglary, with many local areas providing information that helps people better safeguard their homes. This may be what keeps the state’s burglary rate at a relatively low 280 break-ins per 100,000 people.

3. New Hampshire

New Hampshire is generally full of higher-education institutions and peaceful communities that are engaged in local and national issues, and it’s also one of the safest states from burglary. The state’s inclusive attitude toward its residents and their futures may be partly responsible for the low crime rate and burglary rate of 260.6 per 100,000.

2. Virginia

In terms of prison sentencing, Virginia is the worst state in the United States to be a burglar, as criminals found guilty of burglary can get locked up for life. This may be what’s deterring would-be intruders, as Virginia is the second-safest state from burglary, with a rate of 254.6.

1. New York

Surprisingly, New York takes the prize for being the safest state in the US when it comes to break-ins, and it may have the police’s “get tough” policies to thank for its low burglary rate of 223.7 per 100,000 inhabitants. In the 1990s, New York law enforcement increased their arrest rate for various crimes and saw a decline in robberies as a result.

Where does your state rank?

Rank
State
Burglary rate per 100,000 inhabitants*
1
New York
223.7
2
Virginia
254.6
3
New Hampshire
260.6
4
Connecticut
280.0
5
Wyoming
300.6
6
Pennsylvania
309.8
7
New Jersey
312.1
8
Vermont
314.4
9
Massachusetts
322.2
10
Nebraska
338.7
11
Wisconsin
338.8
12
South Dakota
 344.8
13
Minnesota
351.6
14
Maine
352.4
15
Illinois
361.1
16
Idaho
370.0
17
Montana
371.6
18
Rhode Island
373.7
19
North Dakota
395.9
20
Michigan
403.5
21
Utah
416.2
22
Maryland
427.5
23
Colorado
429.8
24
District of Columbia
442.0
25
Oregon
455.1
26
Hawaii
458.0
27
Alaska
475.5
28
Iowa
476.7
29
West Virginia
497.3
30
Kentucky
503.0
31
California
504.3
32
Delaware
504.6
33
Indiana
519.8
34
Kansas
527.6
35
Florida
539.0
36
Arizona
555.9
37
Texas
557.2
38
Missouri
559.0
39
Ohio
596.7
40
Georgia
649.8
41
Tennessee
655.2
42
South Carolina
705.7
43
Washington
711.2
44
Alabama
725.6
45
Oklahoma
726.2
46
North Carolina
745.2
47
Louisiana
759.0
48
Arkansas
760.2
49
Nevada
773.5
50
New Mexico
819.4
51
Mississippi
828.8

*Source: https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2015/crime-in-the-u.s.-2015/tables/table-5

Wherever you live, it’s important to protect your home from invasion as best you can, which includes having a reliable security system and a network of people locally to watch for suspicious activity. Share this link with your friends and family on social media to spread awareness of the risks of burglary and the states where you can best avoid it.

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About Krystal Rogers-Nelson

Krystal Rogers-Nelson
Krystal is a contributing expert for ASecureLife.com who specializes in home security, personal security, parenting, and family safety. With a degree in international studies, she is an experienced world traveler and sustainable living connoisseur. As a homeowner and mother, she is committed to empowering others with the knowledge and tools needed to live secure and comfortable lives at home and abroad.
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