Keeper Review | A Password Manager That Puts Security First

Keeper
Plans starting at 
$0.00
  • More security measures than other password managers
  • One of the best password managers if you want to organize information and share it with others

Passwords protect some of your most important and sensitive information. It might not be a colossal loss if someone figures out the login to your Netflix account, but you’re in serious trouble if they get your banking information.

A password manager helps you create strong passwords and then keep all those passwords safe—and Keeper is one of the most secure password managers available. Plus it’s reasonably priced, easy to use, and customizable.

We’re big fans of Keeper, but is it right for you? Read the review below to find out.

ASecureLife Deal
Get 30% Off Keeper for Black Friday and Cyber Monday

Keeper is offering 30% off the Unlimited, Keeper Family, and Family Bundles for Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

*Terms and conditions apply. See offer.

Keeper pros and cons

Pros
  • Pro BulletMore security measures than other password managers
  • Pro BulletEasy sharing and organization
  • Pro BulletCustom fields for individual records
  • Pro BulletExtra storage with family plan
  • Pro BulletAbility to work with Blackberry devices
  • Pro BulletHigh number of positive online reviews
Cons
  • Con BulletNo bulk password changing
  • Con BulletHigher price than LastPass
  • Con BulletExtra security that makes it harder to switch from Keeper to a new password manager

Keeper plans

Keeper works with the following operating systems and browsers:

  • Mac
  • Windows
  • Linux
  • iOS
  • Android
  • BlackBerry
  • Chrome
  • Safari
  • Firefox
  • Opera
  • Edge
  • Internet Explorer

What stands out about Keeper

Keeper is an excellent all-around password manager, but it especially excels at security and organization.

Standout security

Keeper calls itself a “Zero-Knowledge security provider.” This means Keeper doesn’t have access to any of the data in your vault. Encryption and decryption happen only on your device when you log in. You can learn more about the specifics here.

We should mention that all this extra security brings a few minor drawbacks:

  • Keeper doesn’t offer bulk password changing because it is less secure.
  • You can’t directly import data from your Keeper account if you switch to a new password manager.

We think the extra security is worth the small inconvenience, but if you need to change lots of passwords or easily switch from one password manager to another, Dashlane is a good alternative.

Keeper is one of the best password managers if you want to organize information and share it with others.

You can easily sort records into folders so you can keep all your banking information in one place and your media streaming accounts in another. This might seem like a small thing, but many other password managers don’t offer this level of personalization. In fact, Keeper also lets you add custom fields to records—a perfect spot for storing answers to security questions.

Once you’ve added your info, you can share individual records or folders with other Keeper users—Keeper will include an icon to show you which records are shared. This is particularly helpful if you need to share financial or medical information with a partner, ex, or family member.

Customer reviews

Keeper has lots of happy customers—we found dramatically more positive online reviews than negative. Many positive reviews focus on convenience and security, while critical reviews mention frustration with unwanted autofill and difficulty regaining access to accounts after switching devices.

If you’re willing to pay for a password manager, it’s hard to go wrong with Keeper. It offers security, easy sharing, and custom organization. Plus, it’s supported on tons of devices. If you’re one of the few Blackberry users left, Keeper is pretty much the only password manager you can use on your phone.

...Other password managers don’t offer this level of personalization.

We think Keeper is worth its modest price, but if a password manager is just one too many things to pay for, we get it. If that’s the case, you can get try out the free version of Keeper, the free version of LastPass, or one of our other favorite password managers. Frankly, we suggest using LastPass if you need a free password keeper.

Help other customers make the right choice. Have you used a password manager? We’d love to hear from you. Share your thoughts in the comments below.